Spring has (not quite) arrived!

Browsing my own (few and far between) writings here, I notice how the seasons affect my perspective. I love all of them, and now I can laugh at myself for being so serious about it all. Of course, it’s spring for me so cheery and thriving, growing new things, bright and colorful. 

Love the cool weather, with the sun peeking out and keeping it warm enough to play all afternoon. Kids love it too! Energies are rising, and my eldest just arose so off I go!

“A Girl Like Me”

The sweet song of a 2 year old, as we brisk through the grocery store during the noon hour. As one woman visually scolds her competition walking past her in line- she smiles at the song, and then at me.
Open minded people are the cushion to breathe between one another. We make room for all with politeness and understanding. There’s no judgment.
If we assume the standard is the same for all- we could be causing tremendous pain for those actions we don’t accept. Our rejection is societies ail, and ale. It makes us ill.
So smile- and try your hardest to understand.

What I think about birth centres: an interview

Although this article doesn’t consider American birth centers, maybe we should have more?

SHEENA BYROM

Laura

Laura Iannuzzi is an Italian midwife, currently studying for a PhD at Nottingham University in England.  After qualifying as a midwife in 2001 Laura has worked in different areas of practice, and since 2004 Laura has been employed by the University Hospital of Careggi, latterly at the Margherita Birth Centre.  Laura’s research topic for her study is ‘An exploration of midwives’ approaches to slow progress of labour in English and Italian birth centres‘.

Laura emailed me and asked if she could interview me about my thoughts on birth centres-not for her study, but because she is interested in the relative success of birth centres in England. I agreed of course, as I usually interview others!

Dear Sheena, first of all thank you very much for your availability for this interview. As you know, this is for me a great pleasure and honour; you are indeed largely recognised as an inspirational…

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Disgust, horror, and Western Buddhism

Interesting notions, and insightful commentary follows.

Vividness

Let us turn now, O sisters and brothers, to the Satipatthana Sutta, I:1:6:

If a monk sees a corpse dead one, two, or three days—swollen, blue and festering—he should think: “My own body is of the same nature; such it will become, and will not escape it.”

His mindfulness is established, and he lives detached, and clings to nothing in the world.

And if a monk sees a corpse thrown in the charnel ground, being eaten by crows, hawks, vultures, dogs, jackals or by different kinds of worms—

Or a body reduced to a skeleton, with some flesh and blood attached to it, held together by the tendons—

Or a skeleton, blood-besmeared and without flesh—

Or reduced to disconnected bones, scattered in all directions—here a hand bone, there a foot bone, a shin bone, a thigh bone; the pelvis, spine and skull—

He should apply this perception to his…

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Please Help Me Correctly Direct My Hostility About This Jeffco AP U.S. History Kerfuffle

A little Q and can request for A from a good friend near JeffCo.

WhoAskedUs?

You guys. I think I need some help here on deciding who I should be pissed off at during this whole bangarang. Or maybe I just need to understand what I am missing so that I can more accurately judge the people around me who are all up in arms about this.

In trying to wrap my head around what the crux is of the argument on the APUSH (Advanced Placement US History) curriculum change that is prompting all the sick-outs and walk –outs in Jefferson County. I know it’s silly and antiquated, but as usual, I’ve gone and done some research before forming an opinion. And I am befuddled.

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Not so Happy Meal

I was just thinking the other day about why McDonald’s has been so successful for so many years. They target the next generation, get the consumer used to their product early so it becomes part of their life early on. Kids will bother their parents incessantly, until they get their way and Mickey D’s knows this. Wendy’s targets the older consumer, you know, the one with the billfold. I would like to see restaurants giving out books instead of cheap plastic crap toys that get broken or lost within hours. Fast-food serves it’s purpose though, and we do not have to patronize… it is a choice we make. Let’s make the choice not to….

thefeedia

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

When was the first time you went to McDonalds? It seems as if McDonald’s targets young children by promoting certain movies and including a toy. I remember getting a toy in my Happy Meal and being pretty darn excited. However, the actual meal was not one of much nutritional value and my mother did not let me go very often. Today our world faces a childhood obesity crisis and maybe it is time fast food restaurants stop targeting children.

In Sao Paulo, Brazil, Procon agency is fining McDonalds for $1.6 million dollars as well as other fast food companies. The agency’s top lawyer, Renan Ferraciolli, argued, “There’s no need to appeal as they do to children without the maturity or the rationality to enter the market as consumers.” In the United States we face a similar challenge and unhealthy food is still being advertised to children.

A study by…

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2013 Drought Burden

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U.S. Drought Monitor March 12, 2013

Water is a major topic in Colorado. We are a headwater state, meaning water originates here and flows downward. Western states rely on compacts and treaties with CO entitling them to a reasonable portion of all waters flowing naturally through their states. States to the east of Colorado also rely on water from all rivers flowing towards the Mississippi. Let’s not forget the groundwater systems relied upon by midwestern agriculture are recharged by seepage and flow from rivers originating in Colorado, too.
Colorado has a responsibility to the rest of our country to be good environmental stewards as water pollution, consumption and usage affect the entire country. The way we chose to treat the environment as it relates to water flowing from Colorado impacts the nations food supply, fuel production, and human health.

What happens when there just isn’t enough to go around? I was born and raised in Colorado, you better believe we were taught from the outset not to waste. Every year around this time, the snowpack reports begin to create anxiousness and nervousness for Colorado residents, which is a growing population. What are going to be the drought restrictions this year? Will my grass die ( even though we probably shouldn’t have grass but it is a free country)? etc. It seems as though every year is a drought, should we begin worrying about the apocolypse?

One thing to think about is just how wasteful is wasting water? For example, if you leave the faucet on while you brush your teeth (big no-no), does the water just disappear down the drain? No. It doesn’t just disappear. It goes back to the same source it originated from, the water treatment plant (WTP). They got it from your local source (we should all know the source of our local water supply but most don’t), and the water is treated again because it is effluent- dirty. It will end back up in the water system as it is discharged from the plant. Every drop either evaporates or makes its happy little way downstream, eventually recharging water supplies, and used again by someone else for something else. So this makes me wonder, is it really wasted? Not in the sense that the water is gone. But it is wasteful in the sense that the WTP must consume energy to filter and clean the water coming through your drains.

Which brings up another topic. The most wasteful user of natural resources is “industry”. Highest energy consumers, water demanders, and produce the most pollution. We will shelve this one for another article, or 5.

Ask yourself this- Would it be wasting water if we polluted a LOT of it with a LOT of very harmful chemicals, and then dug deep holes in the ground, and then buried storage tanks with this polluted water? And they say natural gas is the answer, drill baby drill.

Back to what we can do for ourselves… are there ways for households to use their water wisely? Absolutely. Vegetable gardening is a great way to use your water supply to reduce the nations food supply burden, and recharge those groundwater systems the local agriculture economy is relying on. There is of course, no reason to over use this precious resource, but if we use it wisely we won’t need as much. I mean, after all, the fountains in Las Vegas wouldn’t be so pretty if all grew our own vegetables… Which reminds me, it’s time to start seeds!

What are you going to do this year to relieve the nation’s drought burden?